sábado, 8 de enero de 2011

Opting for Virginia Auto Insurance

The state of Virginia has what is called a financial responsibility law, which means that all drivers, whether insured or not, are financially responsible in the event that they are involved in an automobile accident and are found to be at fault. All insured motorists must purchase an automobile policy that covers $25,000 for an individual who is injured or killed during an accident, $50,000 for two persons in the event that they are injured or killed, and $20,000 for any property damage. VA is a state where auto insurance is not required; however, the financial responsibility law still remains in effect.


Uninsured motorists must pay an “uninsured motorists fee,” which costs $500 and must be paid to the Department of Motor Vehicles. It’s important to note that this fee does not mean that said purchaser is in any way insured. It simply means that they are registered as “uninsured,” and must still cover any damages in which they are responsible out of their own pockets. Because of this, opting to purchase Virginia Auto Insurance often ends up saving individuals money in the long run. With the ability to drive uninsured being present within the state, some VA citizens opt to purchase additional Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage in order to protect themselves against possible collisions with uninsured drivers. In the event that such an incident occurs, purchasers will most likely be saved from having to pay large repair bills out of pocket.


Even though Virginia’s laws give drivers the option not to purchase automobile insurance, many citizens decide to do so rather than not. This is because, if an individual is involved in an accident and does not have insurance, then they may still be responsible for any property damage that they happen to cause, as well as any medical expenses, or for the pain and suffering of any injured persons. According to 2009 Virginia Traffic Crash Facts there were 116,744 reported traffic accidents, which means that some would consider forgoing coverage to be a poor decision. With the amount of additional protection that is available, however, should an insured individual get in an automobile accident, there is a good chance that many of their expenses will be covered.


The state of Virginia offers a wide array of additions to preexisting plans, including rental reimbursement coverage, which handles the expense of renting a substitute vehicle in the event that the insured would need to rent a car because their own had been damaged in an accident or suffered comprehensive damage (such as fire or theft). In addition to this, VA has the option of including medical expense and loss of income benefits coverage, creating yet another reason for drivers to pursue increased protection. This addition covers all necessary medical costs that may occur as a result of getting in an accident. This may include funeral costs, and is applied to a person who is present within the vehicle of the insured person, and the coverage persists even if the protected driver is the cause of the accident. Virginians should explore all coverage options that are available and consider purchasing any that can be afforded..